“Place your army in deadly peril, and it will survive; plunge it into desperate straits, and it will come off in safety.”

Sun Tzu
The Art of War

“We've designed chemicals with the intent of killing things. Our hearts, our blood, our genes are very similar to birds', to fish. The hormones that fish use in their reproduction are exactly, chemically exactly, the hormones that we use. Testosterone is testosterone, doesn't matter if you're a frog or fish, dog or cat or a human. So when you generate a chemical to kill one organism, to target some biological aspect of one organism, of course it's going to affect other organisms because we all have this evolutionary history that we share . . . If we're putting a chemical in the water that causes fish to develop abnormally, why do we think we can drink that water and be fine? If we're putting chemicals in the air that cause bees and insects to collapse and to undergo poor health, why do we think we can breath in that air and be OK?”

Tyrone Hayes, Ph.D., Professor of Integrative Biology, UC Berkeley
Island Earth, 2017

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat . . . There is little use for the being whose tepid soul knows nothing of great and generous emotion, of the high pride, the stern belief, the lofty enthusiasm, of the men who quell the storm and ride the thunder. Well for these men if they succeed; well also, though not so well, if they fail, given only that they have nobly ventured, and have put forth all their heart and strength. It is war-worn Hotspur, spent with hard fighting, he of the many errors and valiant end, over whose memory we love to linger, not over the memory of the young lord who ‘but for the vile guns would have been a valiant soldier’.”

U.S President Theodore Roosevelt
Citizenship in a Republic
speech delivered on April 23, 1910, at the Sorbonne in Paris