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“When the Blount report was made public in July [1893] its shock waves rattled all the interested parties. To the extent that [Lorrin A.] Thurston and [provisional government president Sanford B.] Dole relied on [former U.S. congressman James Henderson] Blount's Southern heritage to color his view of the racial component of the situation, the Georgia planter blasted their hopes without mercy. After stating what credit the native Hawaiians reflected upon themselves with their high literacy rate, Blount went on to characterize the natives as ‘over generous, hospitable, almost free from revenge, very courteous, especially to females. Their talent for oratory and the higher branches of mathematics is unusually marked. The small amount of thieving and absence of beggary are more marked than among the best races in the world. What they are capable of under fair conditions is an unsolved problem.’ In his report Blount did not venture to advise President Cleveland on a course of action. His conclusions, however, were unmistakable: ‘The undoubted sentiment of the people is for the Queen [Liliʻuokalani], against the provisional government and against annexation. A majority of the whites, especially the Americans, is for annexation.’”

James L. Haley
Captive Paradise: A History of Hawaii

“One morning in May, on the front page of The New York Times, there was a photograph of a soldier firing his rifle at Taliban attackers from the ramparts of Fire Base Restrepo in Afghanastan. An Associated Press photographer had captured Specialist Zachary Boyd defending his Fire Base dressed in helmet, body armor, flip flops, and pink boxer shorts with little red hearts in which were printed, ‘I Love New York’. I burst out laughing. Any soldier who goes into battle against the Taliban in pink boxers and flip flops has a special kind of courage, I said publicly. What an incredible innovation in psychological warfare. I loved that picture so much that an enlargement hung on the wall outside my office for two years.”

former U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates
Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War

“Thus it is that in war the victorious strategist only seeks battle after the victory has been won, whereas he who is destined to defeat first fights and afterwards looks for victory.”

Sun Tzu
The Art of War